Tag: work-life rhythm

The Purpose of Rest is to Enable Us To Work More, Right?

Deeply and faithfully loving and caring for oneself is enough – it’s not just a pause between activities, writes a seminary professor and psychologist. This was first published in Faith & Leadership. By Chanequa Walker-Barnes I couldn’t move, it seemed. I was hungry and needed a shower, but I couldn’t force myself to get out of bed. It was as if somehow…

Book Review: No More Work: Why Full Employment is a Bad Idea (or, “Why Should I Love God Better Than This Day?”)

A while ago, I checked in with you with a dispatch from a growing genre of books: let’s call it the postwork genre. As I put it there in describing the genre, It’s the contention of many in the faith and work movement that the best way to fulfill God’s plan for the world is for everyone to work, or…

Interview: Surge Network’s “Faith, Work, and Rest” podcast

I want to recommend a new podcast that is exploring connections between faith, work and rest: “The mission of the Surge Faith, Work and Rest Initiative is to help people discern their vocations and reimagine their occupations for the good of their neighbor and the glory of God.  We produce this podcast to curate opportunities for people to listen to…

Book Review: Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

I am always looking for books that discuss neglected aspects of the faith and work conversation. Rest is certainly one such aspect and I’m pleased to see an increasing numbers of books (such as Garden City) discussing it. Rest is written for a secular audience, but it has lessons for the FAW conversation. The author, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, is the founder of…

What the Faith and Work Movement Can Learn From #ThanksForTyping

A provocative article about the hashtag #ThanksForTyping recently appeared on the website Ministry Matters: It had started with a few tweets by Bruce Holsinger, a literary scholar at the University of Virginia, noting that the acknowledgments in older academic work often included the author’s wife for her work in typing the manuscript. In some acknowledgments, the unnamed wife did much…

Book Review: Liturgy Of the Ordinary

One of my oft-expressed critiques of the faith & work movement is that it is largely a privileged conversation. This does not mean that I do not resonate with or appreciate this movement. I am very passionate about the integration of faith into every part of my life and encourage other people of faith toward the same. I do, however,…