Author: Case Thorp

Dr. Case Thorp serves as the Senior Associate Pastor for Evangelism at the First Presbyterian Church of Orlando. He also leads The Collaborative: for Cultural & Economic Renewal. Case is married to Jodi, and they have three beautiful children, Alexandra, Charles, and Brooks. They have enjoyed downtown Orlando as their home since 2005. Originally from Atlanta, Case is a pastor who has served in New Jersey, Texas, California, and Louisiana. Case serves as the Made to Flourish Network co-director for Orlando, a faith & work network for pastors. Teaching is his passion. He teaches for The Collaborative the Gotham Fellowship and the Orlando Fellows, and other seminars. He serves as adjunct faculty for Palm Beach Atlantic University and Reformed Theological Seminary. Case posts blogs on faith and work regularly for The Green Room Blog, and has been published in the Orlando Sentinel and the Wall Street Journal. He holds degrees from Oxford College (AA), Emory University (BA), Princeton Theological Seminary (MDIV), and Fuller Theological Seminary (DMIN in Missional Ecclesiology). Case enjoys time engaging the arts, urban design, politics, cycling and swimming, and both a NYT and WSJ in Starbucks.

Rethinking Pastoral Care Through the Lens of Whole Life Discipleship

At the corner of Liberty and Albercorn in historic Savannah, Georgia, stands a monument to the work of the Roman Catholic Sisters of Mercy. Serving the city since 1845, the sisters pioneered the creation of schools, orphanages, and hospitals, most of which still thrive today. Over the years the sisters served students, orphans, slave children, and more. They battled yellow…

Engaging the Beautiful: A Review of Makoto Fujimura’s Culture Care

“It’s not enough to just build tools. They need to be used for good,” said a repentant and scared Mark Zuckerberg before the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees. Facebook embodies today’s cultural zeitgeist, and its disregard for privacy coupled with its mammoth influence have caused our nation to question how its unhealthy practices are impacting culture. Makoto Fujimura, surely, is…

The Great Recession and the Faith and Work Movement

  Ten years on from the Great Recession, the faith and work movement finds itself growing in momentum and impact. Alongside our effort are other movements that have challenged our collective sense of America and how she is governed: the unique candidacies of Barack Obama and Donald Trump, the #metoo movement, Marches for Women, the Tea Party, Black Lives Matter,…

Museum of the Bible Lifts Up the Dignity of Work

The recent opening of the Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C. brings great attention to this central book for two major faiths: Judaism and Christianity. Wisely, the museum attempts to explain the book itself through its history, impact, and narrative. Dogmatic attempts to explain and apply the meaning of the Bible are carefully avoided; some Christians have even suggested…

7 Ways to Name Flourishing From the Pulpit

In the first post (5 Reasons Pastors Fail to Identify Flourishing From the Pulpit) we looked at the risk of flourishing being a buzzword that people write off, and the reason why many pastors are hesitant to name that which flourishes in one’s community. Sadly, pastors are not well equipped with helpful doctrine, definitions, or demands to identify flourishing, and…

Andy Crouch, What Does the Faith and Work Movement Need to Hear?

In early February, I probed the thoughts of Andy Crouch, author, blogger, and speaker. Crouch had just resigned as executive editor at Christianity Today and moved to the John Templeton Foundation as a communication strategist. His books and speaking engagements have made him a thought leader on culture, and connected him notably to the faith and work movement. I was…