Category: Leader Profiles

The Servant from ServiceMaster: Al Erisman Tribute to Bill Pollard at 2016 Dallas Faith@Work Summit

The purpose of the Faith@Work Summit is to gather active participants and leaders in the faith at work movement from every industry sector to learn from each other and work together to extend Christ’s transforming presence in workplaces around the world. The next Summit will be in Chicago on Oct. 11-13, 2018. Go to fwsummit.org to sign up for updates and to learn more about the Summit. Register for the Summit here!

William “Bill” Pollard joined ServiceMaster in 1977 and has served not once but twice as its chief executive officer. During his leadership of the company, ServiceMaster was recognized by Fortune magazine as the No.1 service company among the Fortune 500, and also was included in its list of most admired companies and achieved market leadership in each of its markets and substantial growth in shareholder value.

He is the author of several books including: The Soul of the Firm, The Heart of a Business Ethic and Serving Two Masters? Reflections on God and Profit. In April 2004, he received the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Business Ethics at Notre Dame.

Albert M. (Al) Erisman is the Executive in Residence and the past Director for the Center for Integrity in Business in the School of Business and Economics at Seattle Pacific University. He teaches business ethics and business and technology both at the undergraduate and the graduate level. He is also executive editor of Ethix magazine.  In April 2001, Dr. Erisman completed a 32 year career at The Boeing Company.

Engaging the Beautiful: A Review of Makoto Fujimura’s Culture Care

“It’s not enough to just build tools. They need to be used for good,” said a repentant and scared Mark Zuckerberg before the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees. Facebook embodies today’s cultural zeitgeist, and its disregard for privacy coupled with its mammoth influence have caused our nation to question how its unhealthy practices are impacting culture. Makoto Fujimura, surely, is…

Salting a Corporation: A Video from the 2014 Boston Faith@Work Summit

The purpose of the Faith@Work Summit is to gather active participants and leaders in the faith at work movement from every industry sector to learn from each other and work together to extend Christ’s transforming presence in workplaces around the world. The 2018 Faith at Work Summit, held in Chicago at the Hyatt Regency O’Hare on October 11th-13th, is now open for registration! The early bird pricing for registration is now available at $179 per ticket, so be sure to purchase soon. 

Gloria Nelund spent nearly 30 years on Wall Street as one of the most successful executives in the international investment management industry. After retiring from Deutsche Bank, she co-founded TriLinc Global; an investment firm dedicated to creating impact investment products that will attract significant private capital to help solve some of the world’s most pressing issues. In 2013, TriLinc launched a $1.25 billion impact fund for U.S. retail investors to provide growing businesses in select developing economies. Gloria is also Chairman and Independent Trustee for RS Investments mutual fund complex, and a frequent guest lecturer at several top business schools. She writes about her talk here at the 2014 Boston Summit:

I spent almost 30 years on Wall Street, with a very successful career in the investment management industry. While I live by a personal commitment to honor God in all I do, I always felt guilty about having a career in business – especially one which I enjoyed and that brought me significant personal rewards. In 2005, I retired to finally be able to “serve God,” and after an almost three year “wilderness” journey of desperately seeking my purpose, God demonstrated that my job had been my very own mission field. I highlight my personal journey, disclosing my three “secrets to success” (working hard, solving problems and helping people) in navigating a career in some of the largest organizations in the world, offering some insight for being the only woman in the male-dominated investment industry, and revealing the one book that influenced all of my actions and perspectives.

How One Church Launched 11 Social Ventures

It’s a late spring day in St. Paul, Minnesota, and I’m standing in front of the Ravoux high rise apartments, a public housing project.  When a bright, multicolored bus pulls into the complex, the waiting crowd outside includes several residents. The Twin Cities Mobile Market has arrived. For the past two years, this grocery-store-on-wheels stops at Ravoux every Friday at noon, bringing…

My Faith and Work Journey (Part 6)

By Alistair Mackenzie (see our interview with Alistair here) Previous posts in this series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5 There were a number of specifically faith-related responses that surfaced frequently in my survey work, including: All Christians equal, but some more equal. Regularly I heard comments that amounted to something about all Christians being equal, but those involved in “full-time…

Why Work, Indeed: Tribute to Dorothy Sayers from the 2016 Dallas Faith@Work Summit

Bronze statue of Dorothy L. Sayers, by John Doubleday. Located on Newland Street, Witham, England.

The purpose of the Faith@Work Summit is to gather active participants and leaders in the faith at work movement from every industry sector to learn from each other and work together to extend Christ’s transforming presence in workplaces around the world. The next Summit will be in Chicago on Oct. 11-13, 2018. Go to fwsummit.org to sign up for updates and to learn more about the Summit.

Dorothy Sayers’ “Why Work” is often cited as a crucial faith and work movement text. Below, Mark Greene gives a moving tribute to Sayers’ life and writings at the 2016 meeting in Dallas.

P.S. Soon we hope to have a review of the book The Artist and the Trinity by Christine Fletcher on Sayers’ theology of work posted here at TGR!

 

Image: Wikipedia.

My Faith and Work Journey (Part 5)

By Alistair Mackenzie (see our interview with Alistair here) Previous posts in this series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 Theses are by their nature pretty academic documents and it wasn’t long before some friends of mine who were mostly business people started to say to me, “Hey Alistair are you ever going to bring some of these high-flown ideas down to…