Author: Benjamin Norquist

Ben Norquist studied history and political science in his undergraduate years (Bryan College, Dayton, Tennessee), and went on to earn his Master of Arts in Western thought from St. John's College (Annapolis, Maryland). Ben is a member of the Academy of Management, with particular interests in spirituality and management as well as entrepreneurship in the higher educational context. Ben enjoys woodworking and mosaic making, remodeling his old house, running through the sprinkler with his kids and enjoying adventures with his wife, Ariel.

Being White in the (White) Faith and Work Movement, Part 2

A few weeks ago I wrote about being a white guy in the faith and work movement, which is also predominantly white. After reviewing the many layers of white leaders, participants, authors, directors, and founders in the movement, I suggested that the faith and work message is in dire need of some more input. Because our movement is demographically narrow,…

Being White in the (White) Faith and Work Movement

“The American ideal of racial progress is measured by how fast I become white.” James Baldwin As a white person I’ve never been very cognizant of my complexion—I’ve always just blended in; in my white family, my white neighborhoods, my white college, my white workplaces, and my white churches. It’s never been a matter of reflection because it’s all seemed…

Report from the Karam Forum, Los Angeles, 2018

The Oikonomia Network hosted their second annual Karam Forum last weekend in Los Angeles. The forum is an opportunity for theological educators at seminaries throughout the U.S. and beyond (there were also a few folks from Australia in attendance) to learn and reflect on themes of faith, work and economics – and really, at a big picture level, about God’s…

Talking about Work: Studs Terkel Recordings Rediscovered

For all of the national conversations about a universal income, unemployment rates, the threat of automation, politicians’ promises for more jobs, etc., the daily experiences of individuals and their jobs can get lost. That’s one reason why Studs Terkel’s 40+ year-old interviews with American workers still resonate today. Terkel published his iconic book in 1974. It was called Working: People Talk…