Category: Transparency

Book Review – The New Copernicans: Millennials and the Survival of the Church

I am excited to introduce you to a book that, while not a faith and work book, has serious implications for the future of the faith and work movement, John Seel’s The New Copernicans: Millennials and the Survival of the Church. I realize that is a strong statement; please read on. John is a cultural renewal entrepreneur and social impact consultant. He…

Book Review: Every Moment Holy

I am excited today to introduce you to a beautiful and phenomenal resource, Every Moment Holy. The book is an excellent cross between John Baillie’s classic A Diary of Private Prayer and Tish Harrison Warren’s Liturgy Of the Ordinary. Andrew Peterson wrote the foreword for the book, which highlights some of his journey: Several years ago some good friends gave me a book. The…

Book Review: Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

I am always looking for books that discuss neglected aspects of the faith and work conversation. Rest is certainly one such aspect and I’m pleased to see an increasing numbers of books (such as Garden City) discussing it. Rest is written for a secular audience, but it has lessons for the FAW conversation. The author, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, is the founder of…

Book Review: Glory In the Ordinary – Why Your Work In the Home Matters To God

I have the privilege to read many fascinating books that discuss different facets of faith and work. I am particularly drawn to books that discuss neglected parts of the conversation. Glory In the Ordinary: Why Your Work In the Home Matters to God by Courtney Reissig is one such book.  This book responds to the need for content directed toward stay-at-home…

Andy Crouch, What Does the Faith and Work Movement Need to Hear?

In early February, I probed the thoughts of Andy Crouch, author, blogger, and speaker. Crouch had just resigned as executive editor at Christianity Today and moved to the John Templeton Foundation as a communication strategist. His books and speaking engagements have made him a thought leader on culture, and connected him notably to the faith and work movement. I was…

Missionaries in a Mercenary World: Apprehensive Individualism

In my last post, I talked about how many professionals, even Christian ones, define themselves in relation to the symbolic image of the Mercenary—a person who is oriented towards “apprehensive individualism.” What does that mean? Individualism isn’t simply self-centeredness; as many scholars such as Robert Bellah and Charles Taylor have pointed out, it can also be a moral vision. But…