Category: Sociological Resources

Book Review: Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less

I am always looking for books that discuss neglected aspects of the faith and work conversation. Rest is certainly one such aspect and I’m pleased to see an increasing numbers of books (such as Garden City) discussing it. Rest is written for a secular audience, but it has lessons for the FAW conversation. The author, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, is the founder of…

What Henry David Thoreau Can Contribute to a Theology of Work

Jonathan Malesic, one of our bloggers, recently sent out a note alerting his mailing list to a paper he’s written for the Journal of Religious Ethics on resources from Thoreau for dealing with the “suckiness” of work (TGR’s term, not Malesic’s). The paper is behind a paywall, but if you belong to an academic institution you may have access to the…

Talking about Work: Studs Terkel Recordings Rediscovered

For all of the national conversations about a universal income, unemployment rates, the threat of automation, politicians’ promises for more jobs, etc., the daily experiences of individuals and their jobs can get lost. That’s one reason why Studs Terkel’s 40+ year-old interviews with American workers still resonate today. Terkel published his iconic book in 1974. It was called Working: People Talk…

Missionaries in a Mercenary World: The Fusion of Faith and Work

In my previous post, I introduced a new framework for thinking about how people maintain and overcome boundaries between faith and work. I proposed we consider two simple categories: overlap and separation—states that may obtain in spite of our intentions to integrate or segment faith and work. In this post, I consider the first category of overlap: fusion. By fusion,…

New $1.5 million grant to fund national research on faith and work

Rice just announced this grant in late April: The comprehensive study will focus on U.S. workers and will comprise a broad-based national, random-sample survey of approximately 12,000 people from multiple religious traditions and no religious tradition. Research will explore faith at work as well as religious discrimination. It will include focus groups with both professional and working-class participants and as…

Top Ten Observations on Millennials and Vocation

Young millennials want to keep their options open. They might avoid decisions as a result or feel relief when someone else makes a decision for them—then they don’t have to carry the responsibility for the risk of discovering later that the decision was the wrong one. This relates closely to the “fear of missing out” often described when talking about…

Book Review: Liturgy Of the Ordinary

One of my oft-expressed critiques of the faith & work movement is that it is largely a privileged conversation. This does not mean that I do not resonate with or appreciate this movement. I am very passionate about the integration of faith into every part of my life and encourage other people of faith toward the same. I do, however,…