The Servant from ServiceMaster: Al Erisman Tribute to Bill Pollard at 2016 Dallas Faith@Work Summit

The purpose of the Faith@Work Summit is to gather active participants and leaders in the faith at work movement from every industry sector to learn from each other and work together to extend Christ’s transforming presence in workplaces around the world. The next Summit will be in Chicago on Oct. 11-13, 2018. Go to fwsummit.org to sign up for updates and to learn more about the Summit. Register for the Summit here!

William “Bill” Pollard joined ServiceMaster in 1977 and has served not once but twice as its chief executive officer. During his leadership of the company, ServiceMaster was recognized by Fortune magazine as the No.1 service company among the Fortune 500, and also was included in its list of most admired companies and achieved market leadership in each of its markets and substantial growth in shareholder value.

He is the author of several books including: The Soul of the Firm, The Heart of a Business Ethic and Serving Two Masters? Reflections on God and Profit. In April 2004, he received the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Business Ethics at Notre Dame.

Albert M. (Al) Erisman is the Executive in Residence and the past Director for the Center for Integrity in Business in the School of Business and Economics at Seattle Pacific University. He teaches business ethics and business and technology both at the undergraduate and the graduate level. He is also executive editor of Ethix magazine.  In April 2001, Dr. Erisman completed a 32 year career at The Boeing Company.

Faith@Work Summit Call for Papers

This is reprinted and adapted from the Oikonomia Network website, but anyone is welcome to submit papers. The Faith at Work Summit is a gathering of over 500 Christian leaders from the marketplace, the church, academy, and faith/work movement organizations who come together to learn from each other and positively impact workplaces around the world. Register now to get early bird…

Engaging the Beautiful: A Review of Makoto Fujimura’s Culture Care

“It’s not enough to just build tools. They need to be used for good,” said a repentant and scared Mark Zuckerberg before the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees. Facebook embodies today’s cultural zeitgeist, and its disregard for privacy coupled with its mammoth influence have caused our nation to question how its unhealthy practices are impacting culture. Makoto Fujimura, surely, is…

Martin Lloyd-Jones on the Everyday Church

By Tim Chester, reprinted from his blog under a Creative Commons 3.0 license. I’ve just been reading a draft of Jason Meyer’s forthcoming book, Lloyd-Jones on the Christian Life (Crossway). I was struck afresh by many things including how Lloyd-Jones anticipated some of our emphases in Everyday Church (that anticipated in the sense of got there ahead of us rather than saw us coming!). Here are three…

One Church’s Tool for Breaking Cycles of Poverty Through Relationships

Reprinted from Made to Flourish. Check out their resource library here. What does it take to revive a dying city? That’s the question Fairhaven Church faced in 2008, when Forbes magazine named Dayton, Ohio, as one of the fastest dying cities in America. After the article was published, we interviewed the mayors of Dayton and neighboring cities, and we discovered the greatest…

Book Review – The New Copernicans: Millennials and the Survival of the Church

I am excited to introduce you to a book that, while not a faith and work book, has serious implications for the future of the faith and work movement, John Seel’s The New Copernicans: Millennials and the Survival of the Church. I realize that is a strong statement; please read on. John is a cultural renewal entrepreneur and social impact consultant. He…